Sunday, January 25, 2015

Australian reserve bank interest rate cuts

Great article here on the history of the Australian reserve bank and their target rates over the years
http://www.propertyinvesting.com/will-interest-rates-go-lower-2015

Check out here for some historical data as well.
http://www.rba.gov.au/statistics/cash-rate/

The real problem with Australian punters is that the moment interest rates are lowered.....property prices rise because people think....you beauty I can afford to spend more.

The problem with this is rates can go back up in 12 months......most mortgages last 25 years.

It would be nice if in the next 0.25% interest rate drop in 2015 owners AND investors went you beauty......I can afford to go to the footy and spent the extra $1250 on themselves and their family.......

Thursday, January 15, 2015

NBN delayed 4 years but able to be brought back on track?

So the real question is in 2 years from now when labor wins....will the NBN be brought back on track?



http://sortius.net.au/no-it-really-is-turnbulls-fault/
In what reads like a job application to Turnbull’s office, the article claims that Turnbull himself is not responsible for the woeful position Australia is in regarding broadband speeds. Instead of relying on facts, figures, and reality, the writer blames everyone else but Turnbull for this sorry state of affairs.

#Francogeddon

Can someone explain to me why #Francogeddon is such a big deal and why the Swiss government even had to implement this in the first place?

I'm confused eg if the swiss are printing a truckload of francs and its not affecting inflation locally why is it such a bad thing to peg the franc to the euro when they are spending the money on acquiring foreign currency (5th biggest foreign currency holder in the world) and not spending it on "guns and war" like the USA is.


If the USA dollar is being propped up as its seen as a "safe haven" (though if you ask me it shouldn't be seen that way) why is the swiss franc being the "European safe haven" seen as a bad thing?






http://www.cnbc.com/id/102340182
The Swiss National Bank (SNB) stunned markets on Thursday, when it scrapped its three-year-old peg of 1.20 Swiss francs per euro.
In a chaotic few minutes after the central bank's announcement, the Swiss franc soared by around 30 percent in value against the euro.